Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    How can Linux read so many types of file systems but Windows cannot?

    Hello,

    I've used both Linux and Windows, and I've noticed that Windows seems rather limited with respect to types of file systems it can interpret.

    Windows handles FAT, FAT32, and NTFS, but I can't think of any others.

    Linux, however, can handle all of those and many more such as ext2, ext3, etc.

    Linux can read a file system created by Windows, but the reverse does not hold.

    Why the difference?

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    0

    How can Linux read so many types of file systems but Windows cannot?

    Well for one thing users want Linux to be able to access and use other filesystems. Windows users on the other hand don't usually need to do so.

  3. #3

    How can Linux read so many types of file systems but Windows cannot?

    I feel that this is a too simple an answer I gave, can someone explain in more detail?

  4. #4

    How can Linux read so many types of file systems but Windows cannot?

    Basically, MS officially only supports MS stuff.

    Linux supports whatever someone makes drivers for.
    It took quite a while to have good NTFS support on linux.

  5. #5

    How can Linux read so many types of file systems but Windows cannot?

    Your explanation is good enough. To flesh it out, gnu/linux works for its users, and windows works for MS. Everything MS does is to solidify its market position, and they don't care about you as long as you're using MS tech. It would be trivially easy for them to include support for other file systems since they're an open spec, but they choose not to. That's open hostility.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •