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  1. #1

    A Couple of Shots: Ft. Worth Stockyards

    Graflex Super D ( 1948 ), Gundlach Petzval (1925)
    half speed Blue X-ray film rated 25 ISO.




  2. #2

    A Couple of Shots: Ft. Worth Stockyards

    These stockyard photos bring back good memories of delicious steaks and some of the best calf fries.

    When did you take these images?

    What was the size of the image captured in the camera. The reason I ask is that I would have expected greater detail from a 4x5 inch image.

  3. #3

    A Couple of Shots: Ft. Worth Stockyards

    I shot them last weekend. The top one is un-cropped 4x5, the second is probably less than half the frame.

    The Petzval ( I think this one is ~9") isn't very sharp at the edges and there was probably some shake going on from that big mirror slapping while hand holding these. I think both were at 1/30th sec. as it was pretty cloudy, probably between f8 and f11 on the first, around 5.6 on the second. It looks to me like the "cone of sharpness in the first takes in the word 'STOCK" and the flag, so that was probably my point of focus. It's always a trip with the curved field of the Petzval.

  4. #4

    A Couple of Shots: Ft. Worth Stockyards

    The style of lights above the sign and the semi-modern street light near the very bottom of the image put this image during or after World War II. And when I shot with Kodachrome II in years gone by, I remember that shots in open shade had to be fairly generous. I could still handhold with my Kodak Retinette 1A and f/2.8 Schneider lens, but much dimmer than that would have required a tripod. I did not know that a Graflex Super D was a single lens reflex or even that SLR cameras came that big.

  5. #5

    A Couple of Shots: Ft. Worth Stockyards

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by scoundrel1728
    The style of lights above the sign and the semi-modern street light near the very bottom of the image put this image during or after World War II. And when I shot with Kodachrome II in years gone by, I remember that shots in open shade had to be fairly generous. I could still handhold with my Kodak Retinette 1A and f/2.8 Schneider lens, but much dimmer than that would have required a tripod. I did not know that a Graflex Super D was a single lens reflex or even that SLR cameras came that big.

    They actually made some in 5x7 but they are rare. Graflex started building large format SLRs in 1898 according to the all knowing internet. Some like mine, but not all have rotating backs.

    The stock lens for this one (not the one I used) was the first that would automatically stop down when shooting. All mechanical linkages, and a lot of fun!

    Here's a shot the wife took. So, does this camera make my butt look big?

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