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  1. #1
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    Parking Garage in Long Beach


  2. #2
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    Parking Garage in Long Beach

    Striking, and kinda retro in contrast. What is the apparent granulation? I like the effect, but how did you do that?

  3. #3
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    Parking Garage in Long Beach

    I'm guessing it's a result of a couple of things. First, it's a scan from a 6x4.5 negative taken with an old (1934) Zeiss folder. Second, I've noticed a lot of whitish circular artifacts from time to time. So, with the roll I developed after this one I did a couple of things; first after stand developing I did the rinsing in the Jobo rather than letting water flush it (thinking this might be bubbles). Second, I did the final rise with distilled water.

    They tend to show up more with this particular camera. I once thought it might be microbubles in the glass as I've read Zeiss had an issue with that from this plant back in the thirties. But they tend to come and go which led me to think it was an artifact from development.

    This one is from the next roll I shot in this little Super Ikonta A; still PanF, but this time stand developed with Rodinal and rinsed with distilled water. I don't see the same thing here so maybe that's it?


  4. #4

    Parking Garage in Long Beach

    My father, who started photographing before WWII, told me that the microbubbles were considered a sign of quality. "Cheap glass doesn't do that."

    Zeiss and Leica had high quality standards. If they'd negatively impacted the optical quality, surely they'd never made it into retail products.

    I don't know - maybe my dad was hood-winked.

  5. #5

    Parking Garage in Long Beach

    Th show up as spots in the image, spots in or on the lens would have to be focused, so I doubt that bubbles in the glass would do that. The light spots in the first image might be bubbles in the developer or something, but I doubt that too - they are far to numerous unless you mixed your developer from seltzer water.

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