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  1. #1

    A Third-Party WEI for Windows 10: Windows Experience Index

    This evening, after tuning up my storage system's two-tiered caching system, I started poking around Windows 10 Pro Build 1709 to look for the WEI. Apparently, there isn't any. Please tell me if I'm wrong.

    To this end, I found a piece of freeware from an outfit known as "Chris-PC:"


  2. #2

    A Third-Party WEI for Windows 10: Windows Experience Index

    Some freeware or shareware might make me nervous, especially if originating in a country like Romania. But the credits that include MajorGeeks seemed reassuring enough; my AV program didn't raise any alarms. I made sure to uncheck selection for installing a bundled item.

    Has anyone seen this? Did I miss something in Windows 10? Or am I right that it no longer contains its own WEI component?

    I suppose my system is performing pretty well. The processor is overclocked currently to 4.7 Ghz, but scores the lowest among component tests at 8.6. The graphics scores surprise me, because the stock settings for my GTX 1070 were those in effect for the test, rather than my AfterBurner OC setting. I suppose I cannot complain about the storage scores.

    I invite anyone to download the software, run it and post a screenie for their system. Here is the link:

    Chris-PC Win Experience Index

  3. #3
    A Payday Loan
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    A Third-Party WEI for Windows 10: Windows Experience Index

    You do realise the figures are virtually meaningless, don't you? The reason that the WEI UI was removed from later versions of Windows was very likely because there's no single definitive benchmark for CPU performance for example. Then there's the fact that the scoring was changed for each version of Windows that had the WEI UI in.

    The only time I paid any attention to the figures was in the era when many graphics drivers weren't yet up to the standard required for Aero to work properly; it was a quick and easy way to know which driver to use. These days, chances are if you use the standard AHCI driver you'd still get an identical or very similar score in WEI to if you used to the most optimal driver that other benchmarks indicated a benefit with. Same goes for graphics.

    If I had to guess, I'd say the WEI was created to help users get a better idea for what hardware specs were required to run Vista properly (as its requirements were way beyond what XP needed for optimal performance), but even then one would get results in the WEI that in no way reflected the difference between say running a Vista 32-bit system with 1GB RAM versus 2GB. Instead it scored how quickly the memory performed as opposed to telling the user that 1GB was nowhere near enough to run Vista optimally.

  4. #4
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    A Third-Party WEI for Windows 10: Windows Experience Index

    Your windows experience index is a 10. Windows 10, WEI 10, everything's 10. Relax and let Microsoft take care of you.

  5. #5
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    A Third-Party WEI for Windows 10: Windows Experience Index

    Thank you all for your insights about WEI. I'm wondering if the CHRIS_PC freeware doesn't just gather the data from the same commands and options offered in the link provided by JackMDS.

    Responding to mikeymikec: Yes -- that makes sense. I used to be the case that the lowest score I'd get came from the storage subsystem. My current storage scores can only be explained by my caching configuration. I guess my preoccupation with that aspect -- shown in posts over at "Storage & Memory" -- raised my curiosity enough to discover this freeware and pose my initial questions here.

    And I probably need a night's sleep . . .

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